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Snort HOME_NET and EXTERNAL_NET Variables

What are the Snort HOME_NET and EXTERNAL_NET Variables?! To know that let’s see how Snort rules work. Snort rules rely on variables to know what traffic they should inspect and what to ignore. Each Snort rule has a header where a bunch of variables are defined such as the action to be taken, protocol, source IP, source port, destination IP and destination port. The most important two bits among these variables are the source and destination IP addresses.

FDM Multiple Admin Accounts

In this post, I am going to show you how creating multiple admin accounts on FDM for GUI accesses can be possible by using some tools you would most likely have in your environment. First, as we know Firepower Device Management (FDM) does not support creating multiple admin accounts for FDM GUI accesses. This is a known limitation and as a result it would mean that all the admins will use the same admin account to log into the FTD. Of course this would lead to share the admin account credentials between the admins which could potentially breach our security.

ASA Site-to-Site VPN Failover “Preemption”

As we know, Cisco ASA IPsec site-to-site VPN preemption is not supported on Cisco ASA. Therefore, this means if the primary VPN peer recovers from a failure the VPN tunnel will remain active with the secondary VPN peer. In other words, if you configure a site-to-site VPN tunnel crypto map with two peers, one as the primary, and another as the secondary, the ASA will always try to initiate the tunnel with the primary peer first. If the primary peer fails and become unreachable, then the ASA will initiate the tunnel with the secondary peer.

ASA TCP State Bypass

One of the security features Cisco ASA provides for new connections is to ensure the 3-Way Handshake is completed between two hosts before allowing any further tcp traffic between the two hosts. The 3-Way Handshake is simply exchanging the SYN, SYN-ACK and ACK between two hosts, each sends the relevant packets based if it acts as a sender or a receiver. If the ASA should see a SYN-ACK packet sent by a host to another before seeing the initial SYN packet, the traffic will be dropped. Similar if the ASA should see an ACK packet before seeing the previous two packets SYN and SYN-ACK exchanged between the two hosts. The ASA does this by inspecting each packet and creating a state for each connection. This a nice feature, however, in some legitimate scenarios it might create some issues and preventing the traffic from being delivered between the two hosts. Let’s see what would be an example scenario for this, and how to apply the fix.

NAT Trick on Cisco IOS Devices

In this post I’m going to talk about NAT exemption. As we know NAT plays a very important role in our networks today, however, with all the benefits we get from NAT’ing, sometimes we don’t need it, or more specifically we need to bypass it. A common case scenario would be for VPN traffic where we don’t want to translate the original IP addresses. In this post I’m going to show you how to exempt NAT by applying a tricky configuration on IOS without having to go through the common way of doing it.

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